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The history of Saint-Tropez

Saint-Tropez owes its name to Torpes, a Roman officer at the court of Nero.

 

Converted by Saint-Paul, he provoked the wrath of the Emperor who had him beheaded in the year 68. The body was deposited in a boat with a rooster and a dog in Pisa, then pushed by the Ligurian currents, it runs aground on the shores of the city.

The red and white colors of the flag of Saint-Tropez are those of the former republic of Genoa.

 

It was in 1470 that Jean de Cossa, baron of Grimaud, called on a Genoese gentleman, Raphaël de Garezzio; together they signed an agreement which allowed twenty-one families from Genoa to settle in the village destroyed and depopulated after multiple invasions. Their mission was to rebuild the fortifications and take care of the security of the Gulf. In exchange, they were free of taxes, a privilege confirmed by all the Kings of France.

 

The first Bravades took place for the first time in 1558 and still celebrate, every May 16, 17 and 18, the Saint Patron (Torpes). It’s a tribute to the bravery of the Tropezians facing their enemies.

They reflect the very special soul of the village, and its inhabitants, who also pride themselves on a long tradition of hospitality.

 

The deep attachment to the sea is another expression of the Saint-Tropez character, due to the glorious maritime military past of the City, which notably saw the success of Pierre-André de Suffren, vice-admiral of the royal armies in the 18th century, Bailli of the Order of Malta and whose statue stands proudly on the port as if to protect it, again and again.

 

A rich maritime past, but also a warlike past as evidenced by the Citadel, which was both the rampart against invasions and also, in 1652, the place where the loyalty of the Tropezians is strongly expressed in the face of the rebellion of the great of the kingdom against Louis XIV.

 

"Ad Usque Fidelis", faithful to the end: this is the motto of the Tropezians.

 

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